Unit X: World Dance

Site: Carmel Unified Moodle
Course: Dance I
Book: Unit X: World Dance
Printed by: Guest user
Date: Thursday, December 2, 2021, 11:44 AM

Description

Hula: is a dance form accompanied by chant (oli) or song (mele). It was developed in the Hawaiian Islands by the Polynesians who originally settled there. The hula dramatizes or portrays the words of the oli or mele in a visual dance form. Hula dancing is a complex art form, and there are many hand motions used to represent the words in a song or chant. For example, hand movements can signify aspects of nature, such as the swaying of a tree in the breeze or a wave in the ocean, or a feeling or emotion, such as fondness or yearning. Foot and hip movements often pull from a basic library of steps including the kaholo, ka'o, kawelu, hela, 'uwehe, and 'ami.  There are other related dances that come from other Polynesian islands such as Tahiti, The Cook Islands, Samoa, Tonga and New Zealand (maori) however, the hula is unique to the Hawaiian Islands.

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1. Chinese Lion Dance

Chinese Dance: The Lion dance is a form of traditional dance in Chinese culture, in which performers mimic a lion's movements in a lion costume. The story goes that once upon a time a monk had a dream in which there were many sorrows and evils plaguing the land. The monk prayed and asked the gods how he could prevent these evils from occurring. The gods told him that a lion would protect them and fight back the evils. The Chinese people had never seen a lion before, but had heard stories that the lion was the king of all the other animals, so the monk combined all the lucky or magical animals he could think of and so made a lion. The Dragon dance is a form of traditional dance and performance in Chinese culture. The Dragon is also the emblem of Imperial Authority. It symbolizes supernatural power, goodness, fertility, vigilance and dignity.

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2. Hula

Hula: is a dance form accompanied by chant (oli) or song (mele). It was developed in the Hawaiian Islands by the Polynesians who originally settled there. The hula dramatizes or portrays the words of the oli or mele in a visual dance form. Hula dancing is a complex art form, and there are many hand motions used to represent the words in a song or chant. For example, hand movements can signify aspects of nature, such as the swaying of a tree in the breeze or a wave in the ocean, or a feeling or emotion, such as fondness or yearning. Foot and hip movements often pull from a basic library of steps including the kaholo, ka'o, kawelu, hela, 'uwehe, and 'ami.  There are other related dances that come from other Polynesian islands such as Tahiti, The Cook Islands, Samoa, Tonga and New Zealand (maori) however, the hula is unique to the Hawaiian Islands.

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Tahitian Dance

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Tahitian Dance Men

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Maori dance men

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Maori Tradition Dance with Poi

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3. Mexican Folklorico

Mexican Folkloric: In the States of Mexico particular dances and folkloric styles disseminated across the country via community, university and professional performance groups. Each regional tradition reflects the rich cultural heritage and unique characteristics of each state or region represented. Characteristics unique to each region are reflected in the music, dance and costuming.

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4. Flamenco

Flamenco

To point out the stomping feet and fiery passion is merely brushing the surface of flamenco dance. Flamenco dance, as one-third of the quintessential Spanish phenomenon of flamenco, has an extensive historical background that parallels the cultural development of Spain itself.

Hailing from southern Spain's outcast populations, flamenco dance and music drew early influences from Greek and Roman and later from Indian, Moorish, and Jewish cultures. With the arrival of the Moorish and Jewish populations to the Iberian peninsula centuries ago, Andalusia's already thriving music and dance inadvertently began extracting characteristics from the newly-arrived populations. The flamenco dance and music that we see today are the dazzling results of centuries of absorbing and flawlessly sewing together elements of this myriad of diverse cultures.




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5. Indian Dance

Bharatnatyam Indian dance

Bharatanatyam is a major genre of Indian classical dance that originated in the Hindu temples of Tamil Nadu and neighboring regions. Traditionally, Bharatanatyam has been a solo dance that was performed exclusively by women, and expressed Hindu religious themes and spiritual ideas, particularly of Shaivism, but also of Vaishnavism and Shaktism.

Bharatanatyam remained exclusive to Hindu temples through the 19th century, was banned by the colonial British government in 1910, the Indian community protested the ban and expanded it outside the temples in the 20th century. Modern stage productions of Bharatanatyam have incorporated technical performances, pure dance based on non-religious ideas and fusion themes.

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Bollywood

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6. African

African dance must be viewed in close connection with African music. People dance in tribes to worship gods. These dances also can teach social patterns and values.  The dances represent aspects of tribal life such as work, coming of age, praising the gods, reciting history, proverbs and poetry. Traditional dance in Africa occurs collectively, expressing the life of the community more than that of individuals or couples.

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7. Capoeria

Capoeira

Capoeira is a Brazilian martial art with its roots originating in Angola and the Congo, that combines elements of dance,  acrobatics and music, and is usually referred to as a game. It was developed in Brazil mainly by West Africans, beginning in the 16th century. It is known for quick and complex moves, using mainly power, speed, and leverage for a wide variety of kicks, spins, and highly mobile techniques.

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