Ballroom Dance

Site: Carmel Unified Moodle
Course: Dance I
Book: Ballroom Dance
Printed by: Guest user
Date: Thursday, December 2, 2021, 12:03 PM

Description

The Waltz

The Waltz is the oldest of the ballroom dances, dating from the middle of the Eighteenth Century.  It is done  Napoleon's invading solders spread the waltz from Germany to Paris; then the dance glided across the channel to England and finally made its way to the United States. The waltz is done in triple time and performed in a closed position.

Below is the waltz and quickstep scene from the movie "Shall We Dance"

1. Waltz

The waltz is a smooth, progressive ballroom dance in triple time, performed primarily in a closed position.

The following scene is from the movie "Shall We Dance". The dancer in blue (around 2:18) attended Stevenson High School and Brigham Young University in Utah before becoming a professional ballroom dancer.

2. Salsa

Salsa is a popular form of social dance that originated in New York with strong influences from Latin America.

This scene is from the 2009 movie Salsa Lessons

3. Tango

Tango is a dance that has influences from European and African culture.The dance originated in lower-class districts of Buenos Aires and Montevideo. The music derived from the fusion of various forms of music from Europe.

The following is a short film starring Santiago Croce and Amy Lincoln. Santiago is originally from Buenos Aires and Amy grew up in Carmel, CA., she graduated from Carmel High School.

4. Swing Dance

"Swing dance" is a group of dances that developed with the swing style of jazz music in the 1920s-1940s, with the origins of each dance predating the popular "swing era". During the swing era, there were hundreds of styles of swing dancing, but those that have survived beyond that era include: Lindy Hop, Balboa, Collegiate Shag, and Lindy Charleston.[1][2] Today, the most well-known of these dances is the Lindy Hop, which originated in Harlem in the early 1930s.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SHcBYGN-3uM

5. Dancing in Jaffa

Ballroom dancer, Pierre Dulaine, takes his belief that dance can overcome political and cultural differences and puts it into action with one hundred fifty 11 year old Jewish and Palestinian Israelis learinng ballroom dance.

Dulain originally started a similar program in New York City to teach inner city kids life skills through dance including etiquette,  self-esteem, discipline, and respect. The documentary "Mad Hot Ballroom" was a film on his work in New York.

The following is a trailer of the movie "Dancing in Jaffa".